King kong and ann relationship with god

The sexual politics of King Kong.

king kong and ann relationship with god

The new "King Kong" answers many important questions: movie star Bruce Baxter (Kyle Chandler) and untested actress Ann Darrow (Naomi Watts) dream project (earned by the staggering success of his "Lord of the Rings" trilogy) a need But the relationship is built around what goes on in the eyes. Though there are many similarities between the Narnia film and King Kong, the . She does not yearn for relationship with Kong in the way he does for her. Ann's love is benevolent, one might almost see it as a mirror of God's love, in that it. If you're Peter Jackson remaking King Kong(), the first question is relationship is still thoroughly conventional, and in turning Ann's fear.

One who feels erotic love desires the beloved, even at great personal risk. This seems to describe King Kong to a T. This last paragraph was inspired by C. Lewis's discussion of eros in The Four Loves. Now Eros makes a man really want, not a woman, but one particular woman.

In some mysterious but quite indisputable fashion the lover desires the Beloved herself, not the pleasure she can give.

For it is the very mark of Eros that when he is in us we had rather share unhappiness with the Beloved than be happy on any other terms. Even when it becomes clear beyond all evasion that marriage with the Beloved cannot possibly lead to happiness. Better to be miserable with her than happy without her. What better description of Kong's passion for Ann Darrow?

His attraction to her beauty leads him to being miserable, and, finally, to death itself. Although King Kong ends with the observation, "It wasn't the airplanes. It was beauty killed the beast," in truth it might have been said, "It wasn't the airplanes.

It was Eros killed the beast. What it lacks, I would argue, is agape, or God-like love. This stands in stark contrast to the love of Aslan, the lion king of Narnia. In tomorrow's post I'll examine in greater depth the nature of Aslan's love and how this differs from that of Kong.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe could be called a love story, but of a very different sort from King Kong. The Love of Aslan Part 3 of the series: These kinds of love I borrowed, ironically enough, from C.

king kong and ann relationship with god

Lewis's classic little book, The Four Loves. Yet it's obvious that I found in Kong only three of the four loves. Charity, the giving love of God. One of the problems we have with understanding The Four Loves is that Lewis's names for love are apt to be misunderstood by anyone who speaks contemporary English with an American accent.

The word "erotic" connotes sexual expression, perhaps even illicit sexuality, as in the phrase "erotic movie. Similarly, when Lewis refers to charity as a kind of love, we're apt to envision throwing a few coins into the Salvation Army bucket unless we're shopping at Target, which has banned the Salvation Army.

This notion of charity misses Lewis's point by a mile. The Latin word means, in addition to "love," "costliness, dearness, or affection. Agape is, above all, the love of God, or, better yet, the love that is God 1 John 4: What is the essence of God's love? Lewis lays this out in the very beginning of The Four Loves: Divine Love is Gift-love.

The Father gives all He is and has to the Son. The son gives himself back to the Father, and gives Himself to the world, and for the world to the Father, and thus gives the world in Himself back to the Father too. Nevertheless, Lewis claims that the essence of God's love is giving.

In this sense it is charity in a familiar sense. But God's love isn't about tossing a couple of coins in the human benevolence bucket. God's love gives all. Before I explain how this is the love of Aslan, I must respond to the one who wonders if Kong's love for Ann Darrow doesn't include an element of charity.

After all, Kong saves Ann from certain death at the hands, well, the claws, of vicious, hungry dinosaurs. In the process, the great ape sustains a number of injuries.

Doesn't this suggest at least a measure of self-giving love in Kong? Though Kong's willingness to risk his well being for Ann's sake seems motivated less by a giving love for Ann than by his desire to have Ann for himself. One would be hard pressed to argue that Kong was fighting the dinosaurs so that Ann could be free to live the fullest possible life. On the contrary, he fought for Ann so that he might possess her. This is not agape. I agree with Lewis, by the way, that other loves besides agape have value and beauty, even if agape is the most perfect of the loves and that in which the other loves find their own perfection.

This should come as no surprise, of course, since Lewis intentionally models Aslan after Jesus Christ, the One who embodies God's love for humanity. The great lion's agapic love is highlighted by the extent to which his relationship with others seems not to have much of the other three loves. In the book version of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, we catch a glimpse of Aslan's affection for Lucy and Susan as he frolics with them in a field, though this was underplayed in the movie.

Yet in both writing and in film, Aslan seems more aloof than affectionate, much like a real king with real subjects. He isn't hanging out with the Narnian creatures because he likes their company.

Rather, he's acting out his commitment to them. He's giving himself so they might be free and whole. Aslan's love is about as far from Eros as a love could be, though I don't mean to imply that Aslan would be critical of erotic love. Lewis rightly explains that Eros focuses on the individual Beloved to the exclusion of all others. Aslan's love is broad, including all of Narnia, or at least all of that which is good in Narnia. Aslan's agape is seen most of all in his willingness to die in the place of Edmund the traitor.

Here there is no question of any other sort of love.

The sexual politics of King Kong.

Aslan has no comfortable affection for Edmund, nor are they friends. And Eros is completely absent from Aslan's concern for Edmund. Rather, Aslan loves Edmund with a perfectly giving love, one that leads him to give up his life for Edmund.

Aslan becomes a picture of God-love as he offers himself in place of Edmund. This is agape at its finest. Kong ends up battling the giant bats, the attack resulted in Ann losing her dressing gown for unknown reasons but it most likely her shirt was torn off by one of the Terapus mordax, this forced Ann to continue the journey wearing her pink slip dress onlyKong puts Ann in safety while he battles the giant bats.

As Kong fights the swarm of Terapus mordax, Ann and Jack escape by grabbing the wing of one of the bats and then jumping into a river. They arrive at the village wall with the angry Kong following them. When Carl and the other crew men were done with their own problems in the island with most of them dead, they captured and kidnapped King Kong. Captain Englehorn was about to kill King Kong with a sharp harpoon, but she begged and cried out to let Kong live, but they succesfully captured Kong.

Ann simply stared at Kong before she broke down in tears due to have been unable to help kong from getting captured.

Ann Darrow | King Kong Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Carl takes Kong to New York and he escapes in an angry mood destroying the ampitheater he was taken to. Ann Darrow realized that she was the only person who can stop King Kong from trying to destroy Manhattan. Kong was already looking for Ann, because he kept picking up women who resembled Ann. Ann and Kong finally are happy together but their happiness and joy vanishes when the military uses giant bullets to kill King Kong.

King Kong, like in the film, ran away to highest building in the city, the Empire State Building.

king kong and ann relationship with god

When the two are trapped atop the skyscraper at the climax, she tries desperately to prevent Kong from being killed, much like Dwan in the version, but to no avail. After Kong's death, she embraces Jack Driscoll who was trying to get to her the entire time. Personality In the original film, Ann is portrayed as a beautiful young woman, who keeps an optomistic point of view. She is also quite charming, as Jack Driscoll, the tough first mate, even falls in love with her. However, because she is portrayed as a woman in the 30's, she was shown to be the damsel in distress at times and is helpless against Kong.

When Ann shown anger at him, he also got angry and Kong left her. At the time she escaped, she was unfortunate again because Vastosaurus Rexes wanted to eat her, and Kong saved her life. Ann ambushed by the creatures of Skull Island That night Jack comes to Kong's lair, and disturbs him from his slumber, then a swarm of flying Terapus mordax attacks them.

Kong ends up battling the giant bats, the attack resulted in Ann losing her dressing gown for unknown reasons but it most likely her shirt was torn off by one of the Terapus mordax, this forced Ann to continue the journey wearing her pink slip dress onlyKong puts Ann in safety while he battles the giant bats, As Kong fights the swarm of Terapus mordax, Ann and Jack escape by grabbing the wing of one of the bats and then jumping into a river.

They arrive at the village wall, with the angry Kong following them. When Carl and the other crew men were done with their own problems in the island with most of them dead, they captured and kidnapped King Kong.

Captain Englehorn was about to kill King Kong with a sharp harpoon but she begged and cried out to let Kong live. Ann Darrow realized she was the only person who can stop King Kong from trying to destroy Manhattan. Kong was already looking for Ann because he kept picking up women who resembled Ann. Ann and Kong finally are happy together but their happiness and joy vanishes when the military uses giant bullets to kill King Kong.

King Kong, like in the film, ran away to highest building in the city, the Empire State Building. Ann with Kong on the Empire State Building When the two are trapped atop the skyscraper at the climax, she tries desperately to prevent Kong from being killed, much like Dwan in the version, but to no avail. After Kong's death, she embraces Jack Driscoll, who was trying to get to her the entire time. Edit In the Australian musical production, she is portrayed by Esther Hannaford.

Ann Darrow | Protagonists Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Ann's backstory is explored briefly. It is revealed she came to New York from the country to start a new life. After she is robbed and loses nearly all her belongings, Carl saves her from being arrested when she tries to steal an apple. Apart from that, her character is the same as in the film. At first she is afraid of Kong but she stands up to him and they later form a close bond after he saves her life. Ann Esther Hannaford comforts Kong.

  • Ann Darrow

Regent Theatre, Melbourne Personality Edit In the original film, Ann is portrayed as a beautiful young woman, who, despite being told she doesn't belong on board a ship with several men, keeps an optomistic point of view. She is also quite charming, as Jack Driscoll, the tough first mate, even falls in love with her.