Predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

population of foxes, the predator, and rabbits, the prey. predator-prey relationship over time one can measure the strength and stability of the ecosystem itself. After we have established basic population dynamic relationships, you will investigate these relationships in greater detail Fox predator catching a prey rabbit. Pictures of foxes, rabbits, and mice. (optional). Background: The predator/prey relationship is, on some level, one of the simplest cycles in nature to compre-.

If all the rabbits are captured during a round, three new rabbits will immigrate into the meadow to start the next round. Each round represents one year or a generation. Use masking tape to outline a 50x50 cm square on a flat surface to simulate a meadow in an ecosystem.

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

Randomly distribute 3 rabbit cards in the meadow. Take the fox square and drop it from a height of 10 to 15 cm above the rabbits in an effort to catch a rabbit. At this point in the activity there is no way that the fox can catch the 3 rabbits that it needs to survive and reproduce. The fox is not allowed to skid and the rabbits should be distributed throughout the field.

  • Predatory-Prey Relationships: The Fox and the Rabbit game
  • Predator–Prey Relationships
  • Foxes and Rabbits

Complete the data table for generation 1. The fox will starve if it did not land on a rabbit and there will be no surviving fox or new baby fox. At the beginning of generation 2, double the rabbits left at the end of generation 1.

Foxes and Rabbits 2

A new fox immigrates into the meadow. Be sure to disperse the rabbits in the meadow. Eventually the rabbit population increases to a level that allows the fox to catch 3 rabbits in a single toss. If the fox catches 3 rabbits it not only survives but it reproduces too! It has one baby fox for each 3 rabbits that it catches. Therefore, if it catches 6 rabbits it will have 2 babies. Fox are not allowed to cheat, but they should try to be efficient.

Predatory-Prey Relationships: The Fox and the Rabbit game

Stupid foxes result in an overabundance of rabbits. As the number of fox increases, throw the tagboard square once for each fox.

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

Record the number of rabbits caught by each fox. The number of rabbits starts atdecreases to a minimum of after 3 months, increases back to in the next 3 months, reaches a maximum of after another 3 months and almost decreases to its starting value of at the end of the year. Graphing the available points, we see the general shape of a sine or cosine function.

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

The number of foxes shows a similar pattern starting at a maximum ofreaching a minimum of 50 after 6 months and returning close to the maximum at the end of the year.

Looking at the graph of the given points, we again see the general shape of a sine or cosine function with amplitude 50 foxes, midline foxes and period 12 months.

Illustrative Mathematics

Now we just have to decide if we want to use sine or cosine to model the function. Looking at the graph, we observe that the rabbit population has a vertical intercept at its midline and then decreases. Because of the choice of using a a negative sine function, the horizontal shift is zero. Again, we have to decide if we want to use sine or cosine to model this function. Looking at the graph, we observe that the fox population has a vertical intercept at its maximum and then decreases.

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

The fastest lions are able to catch food and eat, so they survive and reproduce, and gradually, faster lions make up more and more of the population. The fastest zebras are able to escape the lions, so they survive and reproduce, and gradually, faster zebras make up more and more of the population.

An important thing to realize is that as both organisms become faster to adapt to their environments, their relationship remains the same: This is true in all predator-prey relationships.

predator prey relationship fox and rabbit

Another example of predator-prey evolution is that of the Galapagos tortoise. Galapagos tortoises eat the branches of the cactus plants that grow on the Galapagos islands.