Business behaviour relationship focused

business behaviour relationship focused

I recently had the privilege of listening to Richard Gesteland, the author of Cross- Cultural Business Behavior, speak to a group of entrepreneurs. Cross-cultural Business Behavior: for Business People, Expatriates and Scholars Richard Relationship Focus and Deal Focus The cultural distance between. Aldona Glinska-Newes, (Department of Organizational Behavior and a model of them for referring to successive stages of business relationship-building.

People and interpersonal relations are considered more important than time, making deadlines or sticking to schedules. Conflicts about time are unpleasant and often difficult to solve. Schedule overruns caused by the other party undermine trust.

Why people-focused businesses always win - The Globe and Mail

On the other hand, people from a fluid-time culture can be very surprised by a strong reaction to schedule overruns by the other party. They do their best to avoid awkward silences and there is little consideration for personal space during conversations; people stand close together, often touch each other and look each other in the eyes. People in reserved cultures tend to speak more calmly.

General and continuous eye contact is avoided and they use little if any hand and arm gestures. This is characteristic of Southeast Asia and Northern Europe. This is often expressed in non-verbal ways when the reserved party is keeping their distance or literally taking a step back.

Task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership

Acting modestly can make it easier to do business and come to an agreement. Cultural groups To distinguish between cultures, Gesteland has divided the most important countries in eight groups that have the characteristics of the dimensions mentioned earlier: Group 1 — India, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Thailand, The Philippines These countries are relationship-focused, formal in the way they interact, fluid when it comes to time and reserved.

Group 2 — Japan, China, South Korea, Singapore These countries are relationship-focused, formal in the way they interact, rigid when it comes to time and reserved. Group 3 — Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Greece, Brazil, Mexico These countries are relationship-focused, formal in the way they interact, fluid when it comes to time and expressive.

Task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership - Wikipedia

Group 4 — Russia, Poland, Romania These countries are relationship-focused, formal in the way they interact, fluid when it comes to time and expressive. Group 5 — France, Belgium, Italy, Spain, Hungary These countries are deal-focused, formal in the way they interact, rigid when it comes to time and expressive. Group 6 — Baltic states These countries are deal-focused, formal in the way they interact, rigid when it comes to time and reserved.

Group 7 — Great Britain, Denmark, Finland, The Netherlands, Czech Republic These countries are deal-focused, formal in the way they interact, rigid when it comes to time and reserved. Group 8 — Australia, Canada, United States These countries are deal-focused, informal in the way they interact, rigid when it comes to time and expressive. The cultural dimensions provide insight into the diversity and similarities between the different cultures.

A company should be mindful of the characteristics and similarities a particular country has when it wants to do business with an organisation from that culture. The knowledge and skills gained from this research provides an opportunity to select relevant information about the culture in question and negotiate in an appropriate manner.

How do you deal with Cross Cultural Business Behavior? Do you recognize the practical explanation or do you have more additions? What are your success factors for good organizational culture alignment and development? Share your experience and knowledge in the comments box below. If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our Free Newsletter for the latest posts on Management models and methods.

More information Gelfand, M. A Guide for Global Management. Copenhagen Business School Press. Patterns of cross-cultural business behavior: Marketing, negotiating and managing across cultures. How to cite this article: Patterns of Cross Cultural Business Behavior. Retrieved [insert date] from ToolsHero: Now, it's H2H — human to human — and it's changing how people choose and interact with brands. Want to make a sale?

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That's how you close the deal.

business behaviour relationship focused

It's really about converting every customer from transactional to relational. Transactional customers have a one-and-done attitude towards your company; they'll use your product or service in a one-off situation and never come back.

business behaviour relationship focused

These are customers who don't have a personal connection with your brand, often due to a second-rate experience. But a relational customer will return because you gave them feel-good vibes and treated them like a person, not a customer.

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